Blood Volume Measurements Improved Survival

Prospective randomized control in which 100 critically ill surgical patients with septic shock, sever sepsis, severe respiratory failure, and/or cardiovascular collapse were evaluated. Mean APACHE II scores were comparable across both study arms, at 25 (BVA=50) vs. 24 (conventional, n=50) (p=0.16). All patients underwent BVA testing; physicians were blinded to BVA results for the control group, which was conventionally managed by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC).

   Hypervolemia present in 48% control vs. 37% BVA

   RBC deficiency present in 33% control vs. 16% BVA

   Control group mean delay in transfusion of 1.5 ± 2 days

   PAC did not reliably correlate with volume

66% reduction in mortality

For the BVA group, 44% of test results led to a change in treatment strategy

“An important aspect of care was the earlier treatment of intravascular volume deviations in the BVA group, before the abnormality became clinically manifested.”

Mihae Yu, M.D. – Queens Hospital

Optimal Volume Management is Key to Survivability

Oxygenation by the lungs and pumping of the heart carries
optimal blood volume to supply oxygen to vital organs.

Blood Volume Measurements Improved Survival

Prospective randomized control in which 100 critically ill surgical patients with septic shock, sever sepsis, severe respiratory failure, and/or cardiovascular collapse were evaluated. Mean APACHE II scores were comparable across both study arms, at 25 (BVA=50) vs. 24 (conventional, n=50) (p=0.16). All patients underwent BVA testing; physicians were blinded to BVA results for the control group, which was conventionally managed by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC).

   Hypervolemia present in 48% control vs. 37% BVA

   RBC deficiency present in 33% control vs. 16% BVA

   Control group mean delay in transfusion of 1.5 ± 2 days

   PAC did not reliably correlate with volume

66% reduction in mortality

For the BVA group, 44% of test results led to a change in treatment strategy

“An important aspect of care was the earlier treatment of intravascular volume deviations in the BVA group, before the abnormality became clinically manifested.”

Mihae Yu, M.D. – Queens Hospital

Blood Volume Measurements Improved Survival

Prospective randomized control trial in Surgical ICU

N=100, 70% Septic Shock / Sepsis / ARDS

  66% reduction in mortality

  20% reduction in LOS

  36 hour earlier treatment decisions

  44% change in treatment strategy

“An important aspect of care was the earlier treatment of intravascular volume deviations in the BVA group, before the abnormality became clinically manifested.”

Mihae Yu, M.D. – Queens Hospital

66% reduction in mortality

44% change in treatment strategy

Blood Volume Measurements Improved Survival

Prospective randomized control in which 100 critically ill surgical patients with septic shock, sever sepsis, severe respiratory failure, and/or cardiovascular collapse were evaluated. Mean APACHE II scores were comparable across both study arms, at 25 (BVA=50) vs. 24 (conventional, n=50) (p=0.16). All patients underwent BVA testing; physicians were blinded to BVA results for the control group, which was conventionally managed by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC).

   Hypervolemia present in 48% control vs. 37% BVA

   RBC deficiency present in 33% control vs. 16% BVA

   Control group mean delay in transfusion of 1.5 ± 2 days

   PAC did not reliably correlate with volume

66% reduction in mortality

For the BVA group, 44% of test results led to a change in treatment strategy

“An important aspect of care was the earlier treatment of intravascular volume deviations in the BVA group, before the abnormality became clinically manifested.”

Mihae Yu, M.D. – Queens Hospital

BVA-100 Provides Unique Measure of Capillary Permeability

Capillary leak rate shown to be predictive of ICU mortality in cohort with 70% respiratory failure.

Retrospective Study in Surgical ICU

N = 164

Blood Volume Measurements Improved Survival

Prospective randomized control in which 100 critically ill surgical patients with septic shock, sever sepsis, severe respiratory failure, and/or cardiovascular collapse were evaluated. Mean APACHE II scores were comparable across both study arms, at 25 (BVA=50) vs. 24 (conventional, n=50) (p=0.16). All patients underwent BVA testing; physicians were blinded to BVA results for the control group, which was conventionally managed by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC).

   Hypervolemia present in 48% control vs. 37% BVA

   RBC deficiency present in 33% control vs. 16% BVA

   Control group mean delay in transfusion of 1.5 ± 2 days

   PAC did not reliably correlate with volume

66% reduction in mortality

For the BVA group, 44% of test results led to a change in treatment strategy

“An important aspect of care was the earlier treatment of intravascular volume deviations in the BVA group, before the abnormality became clinically manifested.”

Mihae Yu, M.D. – Queens Hospital

BVA Increases Ventilator Availability by Shortening Days on Ventilator

Adapted from CDC / Economist

Blood Volume Measurements Improved Survival

Prospective randomized control in which 100 critically ill surgical patients with septic shock, sever sepsis, severe respiratory failure, and/or cardiovascular collapse were evaluated. Mean APACHE II scores were comparable across both study arms, at 25 (BVA=50) vs. 24 (conventional, n=50) (p=0.16). All patients underwent BVA testing; physicians were blinded to BVA results for the control group, which was conventionally managed by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC).

   Hypervolemia present in 48% control vs. 37% BVA

   RBC deficiency present in 33% control vs. 16% BVA

   Control group mean delay in transfusion of 1.5 ± 2 days

   PAC did not reliably correlate with volume

66% reduction in mortality

For the BVA group, 44% of test results led to a change in treatment strategy

“An important aspect of care was the earlier treatment of intravascular volume deviations in the BVA group, before the abnormality became clinically manifested.”

Mihae Yu, M.D. – Queens Hospital

Knowledge of volume status avoids dangers of under and over resuscitation, ensuring fluid treatment interventions in accordance with measured volume derangements.

Blood Volume Measurements Improved Survival

Prospective randomized control in which 100 critically ill surgical patients with septic shock, sever sepsis, severe respiratory failure, and/or cardiovascular collapse were evaluated. Mean APACHE II scores were comparable across both study arms, at 25 (BVA=50) vs. 24 (conventional, n=50) (p=0.16). All patients underwent BVA testing; physicians were blinded to BVA results for the control group, which was conventionally managed by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC).

   Hypervolemia present in 48% control vs. 37% BVA

   RBC deficiency present in 33% control vs. 16% BVA

   Control group mean delay in transfusion of 1.5 ± 2 days

   PAC did not reliably correlate with volume

66% reduction in mortality

For the BVA group, 44% of test results led to a change in treatment strategy

“An important aspect of care was the earlier treatment of intravascular volume deviations in the BVA group, before the abnormality became clinically manifested.”

Mihae Yu, M.D. – Queens Hospital

FAQs

How does BVA help manage patients with Respiratory Distress, Sepsis/Septic Shock & ARDS?

BVA precisely measures total blood volume and red blood cell volume with 98% accuracy, guiding an effective, patient-specific fluid management strategy for optimal results.

What is the benefit of knowing the capillary permeability or leak rate?

A persistently elevated leak rate is a prognostic marker associated with a higher mortality. It can be used to triage patients, guide treatment and measure response to interventions.

Is the BVA test FDA-cleared and available now?

The BVA test is FDA-cleared with over 45,000 tests used to date to assess blood volume in a network of hospitals across the U.S.

Key Resources

News & Events


In the Spotlight

BioSpace:

Update on the Novel Coronavirus

MPO Magazine:

FDA-Cleared Blood Test Used to Guide COVID-19 Treatment

Technology Networks:

Maintaining Optimal Blood Volume in COVID-19 Patients

BioTuesdays:

Daxor targeting blood volume analysis to reduce mortality and ventilator use in ICU

MedGadget:

Blood Volume Analysis Using The BVA-100: Interview with Michael Feldschuh, Daxor CEO

BioWorld:

Blood Volume Assessment Study to use Daxor Device

In the Spotlight

BioSpace:

Update on the Novel Coronavirus

MPO Magazine:

FDA-Cleared Blood Test Used to Guide COVID-19 Treatment

Technology Networks:

Maintaining Optimal Blood Volume in COVID-19 Patients

BioTuesdays:

Daxor targeting blood volume analysis to reduce mortality and ventilator use in ICU

MedGadget:

Blood Volume Analysis Using The BVA-100: Interview with Michael Feldschuh, Daxor CEO

BioWorld:

Blood Volume Assessment Study to use Daxor Device

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